Ecological Restoration Specialists

Archive | Announcement

General news from Sound Native Plants

King County cottonwood study

King County recently published a 2-year study evaluating the effects of spraying grass versus irrigating on cottonwood live stake survival in a sunny, sandy loam site. The thought-provoking study found no benefit from applying one gallon of water per plant 5-6 times per season, but the grass-spray treatment had a positive effect. On this site, grass control effectively increased the cottonwoods’ access to water, but the irrigation did not. You can see the study results at https://soundnativeplants.com/…/King-County-Monitoring-Memo…

SNP live stakes outperform others

According to a new study on willow live stake planting by King County, SNP’s wild harvested live stakes outperformed smaller, nursery-grown cuttings and had an astounding 99%  survival rate and 90% cover after 3-years, with absolutely no site preparation or maintenance. You can see the study summary here – in the study, the largest sized stakes were provided by SNP. Even better, we reduced the price on these stakes by 25% since this study was conducted, making them much more cost-effective.

SNP no longer accepting used pots

For years we’ve accepted used pots from the community, and washed and reused them. Sadly, we must now discontinue this service, for two reasons. First, we have grown increasingly concerned about the role of nurseries in spreading potentially disastrous plant pathogens. For example, sudden oak death was introduced into the Pacific Northwest by a nursery shipping infected plants. We have no reliable way to thoroughly sterilize our pots, and we don’t want to be responsible for spreading disease into natural areas. Second, most pots are now manufactured so cheaply that they break apart after one use. In recent years we have landfilled over 70% of the pots people bring us because they are broken and non longer usable. It is with some regret that we make this decision. Sometimes, the path toward responsible ecosystem stewardship is more complicated than we would like, and we think this is the most environmentally responsible choice.