Holodiscus discolor – Oceanspray

Holodiscus discolor - oceanspray

OCEANSPRAY Holodiscus discolor Family: Rosaceae Description: Oceanspray, also known as creambush, is an understory shrub common in the Pacific Northwest and California, from sea level to 7,000 feet. It occupies a diverse set of environments, from moist, coastal forests to arid mountains. Its can sprout from the root crown when the top is destroyed, so it recovers…

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Previous Plants of the Month

Water parsley is a Pacific northwest native plant that grows on stream banks and in wet, shady areas

Water Parsley – Oenanthe sarmentosa

WATER PARSLEY Oenanthe sarmentosa Family: Apiaceae Water parsley occurs from Alaska to California and prefers wet, low-elevation habitats with full sun. It grows in saturated soil and can often be found in standing water or along streambanks. This preference, combined with the dense biomass this species creates aboveground, renders it useful in the context of…

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Cornus unalaschkensis – Bunchberry

Plant of the Month Cornus unalaschkensis – Bunchberry Bunchberry is the smallest member of the dogwood family. A perennial trailing groundcover with 4 to 6 whorled leaves, bunchberry spreads rhizomatously along the forest floor. It prefers to grow in shade on a thick layer of woody duff in the moist forests or bogs of the…

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Garry oak – Quercus garryana

Quercus garryana, also called Garry oak or Oregon white oak, is the only oak native to Washington, ranging from California to British Colombia. It has lobed, deciduous leaves, and greenish-yellow flowers which appear in separate male and female catkins. First peoples traditionally used the acorns for food, eating them roasted or treating them using various methods to remove the…

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Salmonberry - Rubus spectabilis

Salmonberry – Rubus spectabilis

Plant of the Month Rubus spectabilis Salmonberry Salmonberry is a deciduous shrub in the rose family. This shrub is one of the earliest to flower, and its vivid magenta blossoms can be observed right now. It has fine prickles along its woody stems, trifoliate, toothed leaves, and edible berries. The edible fruits are delicate and…

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Grand Fir – Abies grandis

PLANT OF THE MONTH Abies Grandis (Grand Fir)           Grand fir is native to the Pacific Northwest from Montana to the Pacific coast and southern British Columbia to northern California, and it inhabits altitudes from sea level to 1800 meters. Unlike Douglas-fir, Grand fir is a “true fir” of the genus…

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Western Hemlock – Tsuga heterophylla

PLANT OF THE MONTH Tsuga heterophylla (Western hemlock) The western Hemlock is easily identifiable by its drooping, conical top and similarly drooping branches. It ranges from 165 to 230 feet in height, and can reach up to 9 feet in diameter. Its needles are flat, short, and rounded, and their dark green top surfaces contrast…

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Swamp Gooseberry – Ribes lacustre

PLANT OF THE MONTH Ribes lacustre (Black Swamp Gooseberry) This gooseberry is a member of the Ribes family, and can be found throughout temperate regions of North America all the way from sea level to subalpine elevations. It is known to grow in a wide variety of habitats, which include slopes, swamps, stream banks, open…

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Mock Orange – Philadelphus lewisii

Mock Orange – Philadelphus lewisii

Mock orange grows wild from Southern British Columbia to Northern California and east to Montana, but is possibly better known for its use in landscaping. This hardy shrub produces blooms with an amazing sweet, citrusy scent that attracts pollinators of all kinds. Hummingbirds, certain kinds of butterflies and especially bees flock to this plant in…

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